Saturday, February 11, 2017

Lions

This piece I unveiled at Safari Club International. Though many of the art patrons prefer paintings of male lions, this is a painting I really wanted to do. (My first piece to sell at the show was a male lion.)

When I think about what to paint for a show, there is consideration for the crowd. But, some pieces I do because they move me and tell a story. I spent lunch on the Serengeti with three lioness one day and they were so comfortable with us, they napped. When I can be with wildlife and observe their natural behavior, that is always a special moment.

Cat Naps
10" X 17"
Original Oil

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Anatomy of a Show

You've seen pieces I have painted in the last several months and I thought I would give you a "behind the scenes" look at my latest show.

Once the paintings are completed, varnished, and framed, the packing begins. My husband and I put together a floor plan of my booth area. The island booth is 20 feet by 20 feet and both the inside and outside walls are filled with my original oil paintings save a small interior corner for giclee canvas prints. I have a total of 135 linear feet of wall space. With this kind of space, a lot of time is saved with a floor plan which ensures I bring enough to fill the space and not too much.

Packing involves lots of lists: booth parts, lights, electrical cords, light bulbs, desks, panels, shelves, step stool, dolly, and the black box. The black box is my catch-all box: utility knife, electrical tape, scissors, description cards, pens, flyers, tape, drapery hooks, velcro, and lots of other stuff. Then there are the paintings and prints. It generally takes 5- 6 hours to pack, all carefully accounted for in layers.

The next day, Friday, we are off on a two-day drive to Las Vegas, Nevada. We have two mountain passes and fortunately the driving was good both ways. Sunday morning we are up at 5 am so we can get to the staging area with the trailer by 5:45 am to stand in line and get a number to drive into the building. (we were #8 but were the 3rd in the building at 7:30 am.) Unload approximately 1800 pounds and it is time to start.

First we lay the carpet and then erect the walls. By 3pm, we quit for the day after finishing all the electrical.

Second day.  We start around 8am and by 3 pm, all the paintings are hung with description cards. Errands include picking up more light bulbs, extra extension cords, new guest book, and another table cloth. On Tuesday, I have a lunch meeting and spend the afternoon with finishing touches.

 Final touches, husband Jim vacuuming

The show (Safari Club International) opens on Wednesday morning.




When the show finishes at 5 pm Saturday, our crew of 7 dismantles the booth and carefully packs all the paintings (including all the sold ones for shipping) in 90 minutes. Many thanks to Jim V., Jeremy, Cody, Sariah, and Kevin, and of course my husband Jim, who all made the packing a fun experience.

Sunday morning we bring our truck and trailer into the building at 6:15 am, use our carefully constructed packing list and my husband and I load the truck and trailer. We are on the road home before 8 am.



Of course once home, we unpack and I begin ordering custom boxes for all the shipments.
It was a great show and I broke all my previous records for sales.

In the next few posts, I'll show a few of the paintings I finished just before the show.

NatureWorks in Tulsa, Oklahoma is my next show. February 24th and 25th at the Renaissance Hotel and Convention Center.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Show Time

As soon as my 2016 Safari Club International show ends, I am thinking about the 2017 show. This year's show is at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada.
With a quad-island booth (20 feet by 20 feet) and the design we erect, I have 135 linear feet of wall space to fill.

One of the small pieces I just completed for the show is below.

Ancient Ones
7" X 10"
Original Oil

The small pink dots in the background are the flamingos of Lake Nakuru, Kenya.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Finished

Center Stage
18" X 12"
Original Oil

Friday, January 13, 2017

The Head


Most of this head is being painted with a new small angled flat brush. I can create an edge and a wedge of paint. Small details like the eyes are painted with a fine round brush.

A number of years ago, my husband watched as a struggled with an old brush which had frayed beyond easy use. He asked me how much a new brush cost. I said, "$3-$7." When he asked me how much extra time I was spending because I didn't have a new non-frayed brush, it was pretty clear I had been stingy with my brush purchases. Now if I feel I need a new brush I throw caution to the wind and part with $4.25 - all at once!


Tuesday, January 10, 2017

New Painting


As I work on this piece, I am reminded why I like Jack Richeson toned gessoed hardboard panels. Paint can really slide around on them but they have enough tooth to hold the paint in place. For this piece I am using the umber toned board. While their gray is nice, it does lend a cool tone to a painting.

Before beginning the background, I mixed a number of greens with sap green as my base. Lemon yellow, Cadmium yellow, burnt sienna, and naples yellow all came into play for the brighter greens. The deep background is ultramarine blue, raw umber and sap green. The darkest color was not evenly mixed so I would have some variation and not a solid mass.

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Oil Painters of America

Happy New Year!

I have exciting news. Oil Painters of America has awarded me Signature Member status.



 This prestigious organization with over 4000 juried members has at last count awarded Signature status to fewer than 210 members. (Master Signature Member status has 50 members.)


http://oilpaintersofamerica.com/